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Pie for Breakfast: Memories of Thanksgiving

By Sue Burghard Brooks

Thanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday as far back as I can remember. There was something magical about Mom, Dad, my brother and me piling into the family car on Thanksgiving eve and driving from our NJ home to upstate NY.

We’d always spend “turkey day” and a few days thereafter with Dad’s side of the family. Inevitably, it would also snow while we were there — and I love snow!

Throughout the years, the Big Event was either hosted by Dad’s parents, his older brother and family or his younger brother and family.

My first cousins were fairly close in age to my brother and me, and we enjoyed spending time together. And we were loud! This made for some raucous times at the proverbial “kids’ table.”

Traditions

Our celebrations were rich with traditions. Great Uncle Steve, sipping his Johnny Walker Black, would tell stories of his travels abroad with the military or with Great Aunt Kate, who would often chime in. If a piano were nearby, Grandpa would play and sing. And without fail, you’d hear Grandma exclaim, “Oh, George!” multiple times, admonishing her husband for yet another groan-worthy joke or story.

Recaps of times gone by and peals of laughter were de rigueur at these gatherings. And the food! I’m blessed to have relatives who were phenomenal cooks and bakers.

My fondest memories are from Thanksgivings of later years, spent in the small-but-cozy Utica, NY, home of Dad’s youngest brother and family: my Uncle Paul, Aunt Marie, their four children, and Aunt Marie’s Mom, “Gram.”

Turkey and Trimmings and Pie — Oh My!

Second cousins eventually joined the family and the kids’ table on their enclosed porch got even tighter! However, there always seemed to be enough room — and endless amounts of fantastic food.

I always marveled at how my Aunt Marie managed to have the gigantic turkey (there could be upwards of 30 people) plus all the fixings and other goodies ready at the same time. She had limited space to do this since family members around the “adults’ table” took up most of the room in her kitchen and counter space was at a premium!

Desserts were a bounty of heavenly homemade pies as well as Italian cookies and pastries from a favorite nearby bakery.

The morning after Thanksgiving, we carried on perhaps the greatest long-standing tradition of all: leftover pie for breakfast.

Giving Thanks

Sadly, we stopped heading upstate for “turkey day” decades ago as families scattered. Many of our elder relatives had also passed on.

As much as my heart aches for “the good old days” — spending the happiest Thanksgivings with Dad’s family and being with those who now are gone or a distance away — I am thankful that I have plenty of fond memories and photos to lift my spirits.

This Thanksgiving, may your heart be filled with gratitude and your stomachs, with delicious food.

And if you’re also unable to spend time with those you love, whether they’re near or far or no longer walking the earth, may your memories be as sweet as pie.

Speaking of pie…I do hope you’ll join me and my relatives in enjoying a slice or two for breakfast the morning after!

Sue Burghard Brooks (pictured above, far right) is entering her third year as NJAAW’s Communications Manager and is also Executive Producer of the nonprofit’s monthly “Aging Insights” TV program. She confesses that her favorite Thanksgiving pie is mincemeat though growing up, she never ate it because her older cousin Ed (pictured front, holding his youngest sister, De) said that it was made of monkey meat!

Diabetes Self Management Courses

Holiday time can make it difficult to stick to your healthy eating plan, there are so many goodies to indulge in. And you want to participate and feel all the joy that comes from sharing a special meal with family and friends. With party after party, it can get tough. Even more so for those who need to watch their food intake due to a health issue. Particularly those with diabetes, all those sweet treats are hard to resist- holiday cakes and cookies around every corner.

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Having the right tools to manage your diabetes can help, not just at holiday times, but all year long. Luckily, our friends at HQSI (Healthcare Quality Strategies, Inc.) offer a six-week program to help people learn to manage their diabetes. Below is a schedule for the Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP) as well as more information and how to contact them.

If you do not see a program that is convenient to you, contact HQSI to ask about future programs. If you manage a Senior Center or other program and are interested in having someone come to talk to your group about diabetes, you can also contact HQSI directly to coordinate something. With a New Year beginning soon, it is a good time to plan and make new health goals.

Workshop Location Dates Time To Register
Spruce Street Senior Apts.

15 Spruce Street

Kearny, NJ 07032

Tuesdays

 

January 10, 2017 to February 14, 2017

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

Call Sonia Salazar at:

(201) 997-4270

Elizabethport Presbyterian Ctr.

(Spanish)

 

184 First Street

Elizabeth, NJ 07206-1855

Wednesdays

 

January 11, 2017 to

February 15, 2017

9:30 a.m.

to

12:00 p.m.

Call Beatrice Beard at:

(908) 351-4850

YMCA of Newark and Vicinity

 

600 Broad Street

Newark, NJ 07102-4504

Wednesdays

 

January 18, 2017 to

February 22, 2017

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Sayreville Public Library

 

1050 Washington Road

Parlin, NJ 08859-1091

Thursdays

 

January 19, 2017 to

February 23, 2017

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

Call Jennifer at:

(732) 727-0212 ext. 25 or go to sayrevillelibrary.org

Franklin Township Senior Center

 

505 Dermott Lane

Somerset, NJ 08873

Wednesdays

 

February 1, 2017 to March 8, 2017

9:30 a.m.

to

12:00 p.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Shore Medical Center

Jenkins Room

 

100 Medical Center Way

Somers Point, NJ 08244-2300

 

Thursdays

 

February 2, 2017 to

March 9, 2017

 

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

 

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Little Egg Harbor Township Community Center

 

317 W. Cala Breeze Way

Little Egg Harbor Twp., NJ 08087

Thursdays

 

February 2, 2017 to

March 9, 2017

10:00 a.m.

To

12:30 p.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Church of the Holy Spirit

 

220 East Main Street

Tuckerton, NJ 08087-2242

Thursdays

 

February 2, 2017 to

March 9, 2017

1:30p.m.

to

4:00p.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Annabelle Shimkowitz Senior Center @ Municipal Complex

 

330 Passaic Street

Passaic, NJ 07055-5815

Mondays

 

February 6, 2017 to

March 20, 2017

9:30 a.m.

to

11:30 a.m.

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

Montclair Public Library

 

50 S. Fullerton Avenue

Montclair, NJ 07042-2629

Fridays

 

March 3, 2017 to

April 7, 2017

 

10:00 a.m.

to

12:30 p.m.

 

Call Jarmaine Williams at:

(732) 955-8168

 

For each six-week workshop, we regret that there can be no new attendees after the second session.

 

For more information, please contact Jarmaine Williams:  (732) 955-8168

 

 

In the aftermath of Sandy

In the aftermath of Sandy

Many New Jerseyans were affected by Hurricane Sandy, a number of them seniors. In the past two weeks since then we’ve seen many images of destruction and heard many stories of days without power.

If you are still in need of assistance as you recover from the damage Sandy left behind, here are some important numbers and websites to know:

Dial 2-1-1 or visit www.nj211.org to find out about local resources for food, shelter, transportation, etc.

If you need disaster assistance, apply for FEMA by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (1-800-621-3362) or visit www.disasterassistance.gov Please know that there are deadlines to requesting help and that you need to reach out to FEMA directly, they will not contact you.

Your local chapter of the Red Cross (http://www.redcross.org/find-help) and the Salvation Army (http://www.use.salvationarmy.org) can also be of assistance.

If you or someone you know needs help coping with the trauma from the Hurricane you can contact the NJ Disaster Mental Health Hotline 1-877-294-4357.

There have been many reports about the help being offered to Hurricane Sandy victims. Countless organizations and individuals have provided, shelter, food, heat, clothing and comfort to those affected. Unfortunately, during times of disaster, we see some people who would rather take advantage of the situation rather than help. Please be on the look out for scams.

One, price gouging is illegal, to report it call (862) 209-0130 or (973) 220-3474.

There have been a couple of instances of people posing as utility or inspection personnel and then attempting to rob the home once they gain entry. Anyone approaching your home as a utility worker or inspector should have proper ID and have no problem showing it to you or verifying the reason for their visit. Don’t let anyone into your home that you are not 100% sure is who they say they are. Make sure to call the police and report any false attempts to gain access to your home.

There may also be people posing as false insurance programs or other assistance programs. Please make sure to always ask for proper ID and verify that the program or services they are offering are legitimate. Report any problems to your local police department.

And for those of you looking for ways to help, be aware of that there are also scammers posing as charities . The IRS has issued a statement encouraging people to look out for scam artists impersonating charities to help Hurricane Sandy victims. Donate to recognized charities only. Some will even try to use a name similar to a recognized organization so be sure to look closely. Do not give out personal information. There are various ways that these scammers will try to reach you, they may call on the phone, by email or through the use of a phony website set up to mimic that of a known charity. Legitimate charities may also be found on the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Web site at fema.gov.

Call the IRS toll-free disaster assistance telephone number, 1-866-562-5227, if you are a hurricane victim with specific questions about tax relief or disaster related tax issues.

If you would like to volunteer to help those affected by Sandy, you can also contact your local Red Cross or Salvation Army or call the NJ Volunteer Emergency Response Hotline at 1-800-JERSEY-7 (1-800-537-7397)

Recovering from Sandy will be a lengthy process. You may have long wait times for responses from disaster assistance programs, but know that help is coming.

New information about changes to the Food Stamp Program (SNAP)

Press Release

Released  on April 6, 2010                                                                                                    

New information about changes to the Food Stamp Program (SNAP)

Trenton- New Jersey’s Food Stamp Program, also known as SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) has raised its income limits. Previously the income limit was at 130% of the FPL (Federal Poverty Level) and it has now been increased to 185% of the FPL. In some cases, assets such as checking or savings accounts, will not affect eligibility. These two new changes will allow the Food Stamp Program to help more people. During difficult economic times, more people are in need of help to buy food for their families.

As of April 2010, 185% of the FPL means that to be eligible for Food Stamps an individual’s gross monthly income would be $1670 or less and that a couples gross monthly income would be $2247 or less. For larger household add approximately $577 per each additional person.

“These changes are significant for families and seniors who live on the edge of poverty” according to Grace Egan, Executive Director of the NJ Foundation for Aging. “Seniors are under enrolled in this vital community program. We are interested in getting the word out that these changes mean many seniors will now qualify for this program”.

You can find an application for SNAP (Food Stamps) online at www.njfoodstamps.com or at www.njhelps.org, where you can use an online screening tool. For more information or to find your local SNAP office call 1-800-687-9512.

 To learn more about the work of the Foundation visit www.njfoundationforaging.org or call 609-421-0206.

The New Jersey Foundation for Aging was established in 1998 to create ongoing financial support for aging services in New Jersey.  Its mission is to expand innovative approaches in the delivery of services that enable older adults to live in the community with independence and dignity.

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